Thursday, June 13, 2013

Endothelial cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii: differences between cell types and parasite strains

Parasitol Res. 2013 Jun 10. [Epub ahead of print]

Endothelial cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii: differences between cell types and parasite strains

Cañedo-Solares I, Calzada-Ruiz M, Ortiz-Alegría LB, Ortiz-Muñiz AR, Correa D.

Laboratorio de Inmunología Experimental, Subdirección de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría Secretaría de Salud, Mexico, Distrito Federal, Mexico.

Toxoplasma gondii disseminates and causes congenital infection by invasion of the endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the ability of two strains to invade two endothelial cell types. Tachyzoites of the RH and ME49 strains were expanded in Balb/c and C57BL6-RAG2-/- mice, respectively. Tachyzoites were harvested from 72 h Vero cell cultures and incubated for 30 min to 4 h at 10:1 parasite/cell ratio in 24-well plates, containing monolayers of either HMEC-1 line or human umbilical cells (HUVECs). The number of infected cells and parasitic vacuoles per infected cell were counted in Wright stained slides. A slow increase in the proportion of infected cells occurred but varied according to cell type-parasite strain combination: ME49 tachyzoites invaded up to 63 % HMEC-1 cells, while RH parasites infected up to 19 % HUVECs. ME49 and RH tachyzoites invaded 49 and 46 % HUVECs and HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Reinvasion and formation of new parasitophorous vacuoles of infected cells was more frequent than invasion of noninfected cells. The results support that the factors influencing invasion, and thus dissemination and vertical transmission, are parasite type, host cell type/subtype, and activation state. Interestingly, T. gondii virulence does not seem to relay on its invasion efficiency, but probably on replication speed.

PMID: 23749089 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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